2013-08-21

Eight rules for hiring smart

Drake Editorial Team

Hiring smart is productive, not doing so is unproductive. The most common, and fatal, hiring mistake is to find someone with the right skills but the wrong mind-set (attitude) and hire them on the theory, "We can change them."


Many individuals have had the pleasure of hiring directly or indirectly hundreds of people throughout their career. Many have also experienced the distasteful process of having to fire individuals. The vast majority never fired someone for lack of skills; it is most always the result of behavioural problems. Individuals are not fired for a bad attitude, but rather for specific behavioural problems which were a result of their attitude.


The following eight rules for hiring from the outside and for promoting from within can go a long way toward building a highly productive organization.


1. Hire attitude, train skill. (Southwest Airlines mantra)
2. Hire people for "who they are" first, and "what they know" second. What they know, and will need to know, changes. Who they are doesn't.
3. Hire people first with the right mind-set, and second with the right tool-set.
4. Hire people who have a demonstrated record of life-long learning and the "application" of that learning.
5. The best predictor of future behaviour is past behaviour. Ask interview questions that get them to talk about how they have reacted in certain situations (change, stress, wins, conflict, deadlines, teamwork, etc.) Listen to learn.
6. Hire people who are passionate and have accomplished things in their life.
7. Look for energy, humour, spirit and self-confidence, and a great attitude.
8. Hire people who are excited about managing their own career, contributing to the greater good of the organization and involved in the community. Great people are normally greatly involved!

 

Now more than ever, organizations need every individual to contribute in a positive and productive manner. Individuals with a poor attitude or behavioural problems take away from the time and productivity of others. If you are in a management position, your good employees expect you to deal with the problem employee. Nurturing and mentoring the great attitude employee is a sure way to grow and sustain organizational success.


Executive coach and author Roger M. Ingbretsen provides career guidance to professionals, managers, supervisors and all individuals looking for "real world" career development information. He helps you plan, manage and succeed in your career. Learn more about his informative 2-day Executive Workshops and what he can do for you and/or your organization, and access free management and career development articles. Visit www.ingbreten.com or call 509-999-7008 (U.S.)

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